Introducing a New Bit

It is a good idea with a young, inexperienced horse to work with his mouth before introducing a bit. Play with his lips. Put your fingers into his mouth, massage his bars, rub his palate. This can be done with newborn foals during the imprinting process or on an older horse who has not had… Read More Introducing a New Bit

Curb Chain

The curb chain or strap is mounted in the chin groove under the horse’s chin between the bit shanks of the bit. It steadies the bit within the mouth (keeping it centered), and it controls the lever action of the reins. It keeps the bit shanks from bit from over-rotating. The curb strap acts as… Read More Curb Chain

Twisted Wire Bits

Generally speaking, twisted wire bits require a horse with more training and experience and a rider with a softer, more experienced touch. While fat, thick mouthpieces spread the bit pressure over a larger area, twisted wire bits concentrate pressure, making it more intense in a smaller area of the mouth. A wire snaffle is rarely… Read More Twisted Wire Bits

Copper Bits

A copper bit is beautiful to see. However, it is not just a pretty face. Copper has a use. Horses are as different as people are when it comes to what tastes they like or dislike. Many horses appear to like the sweet taste of copper and seem to accept their bit better than a… Read More Copper Bits

Bit Shanks

A Bit Shank is the bar that has a ring that attaches to the bridle headstall at the top (headstall loop), the bit in the middle and and the rein ring on the other end. The length of the shank is important, as the longer the shank below the bit (lever), the more pressure is… Read More Bit Shanks

Bit Leverage

Horse Bit Leverage Explained Leverage is the pounds of pressure transmitted through a horse’s bit per pounds of pressure from a rider’s hands through the reins. If a rider pulls on the reins with one pound of pressure and the horse’s bit transmits one pound of pressure so that the horse actually feels one pound… Read More Bit Leverage

Gag Bit

Gag Bits Explained I am not an expert in Gag Bits. Most of this information was gleaned from other’s writings. If any of our Horse-Pros.com friends would like to contribute, please feel free to do so. The sliding action of a Gag Bit applies most of the pressure to the horse’s lips and corners of… Read More Gag Bit

Spade Bit

Solid High Ports such as Cathedrals and spooned ports make contact with the palate of the horse – some in more severe ways than others. The rider’s soft hands are critical here. The balance of a Spade, Spoon or Cathedral bit is critical, as they must be ridden straight-up neutral to keep the spoon off… Read More Spade Bit

Curb bit w/Snaffle Mouth

Shop Shank Snaffle Bits Introduction to Broken-Mouth Curb Horse Bits As the horse progresses and acquires more experience, you can start using bits with thinner mouthpieces and longer cheeks Sometimes called a “cowboy snaffle” bit, many experts do not regard this as a snaffle at all because it applies leverage and chin pressure. Others don’t… Read More Curb bit w/Snaffle Mouth

Curb Bit Basics

Shop Curb Bits Curb Bits Explained Curb bits are suited for more mature horse (4 to 5 years old) with the capacity of accepting more pressure from the bit and more pressure on their face. Because they were used primarily for working horses and cowboys who needed one hand free for roping, shooting, and hat-tipping,… Read More Curb Bit Basics