Training Theory: Introducing Maneuvers

Each time you introduce a new move, your horse is building on past maneuvers. That is one reason that it is advisable to follow the steps in the Horse Training Exercises in order. Each lesson builds on the previous lesson. You may not see the importance of any particular lesson at any particular time, but,… Read More Training Theory: Introducing Maneuvers

Training Theory: Pressure

There are two types of Pressure: Physical pressure and Intention pressure (threat). Physical pressure: that is the tactile feelings such as the bit against the bars in his mouth or the rope halter bearing down on the poll at his head. It can be as uncomfortable as necessary to move him, or as subtle as… Read More Training Theory: Pressure

Training Theory: Release Training

The Three R’s of Horse Training: Release. Relax. Reward. Release training is the art of releasing a horse from pressure at the exact moment that he complies with your cue or request. It is the basis of all horse training – the holy grail of horse trainers. Horses don’t learn from the application of pressure.… Read More Training Theory: Release Training

Training Theory: Natural Horsemanship

In the early days of cowboys and vaqueros, horses were “broke” to ride. The emphasis of most horse training was on overpowering a horse or wearing him down until he accepted a rider on his back. Natural Horsemanship has been a growing trend. There are several famous natural horse trainers who propose that the best… Read More Training Theory: Natural Horsemanship

Training Theory: Yield

Teach Your Horse to Yield to Pressure Yielding: when a horse softens to (moves away from) physical pressure instead of resisting and moving into it. (see Pressure) Teaching a horse to yield to pressure is a paramount building block of horse training. Yielding will turn into an entire resistance-free attitude. Horses naturally push into physical… Read More Training Theory: Yield

Horse Anatomy: Pastern

Approximately 60% of the weight of a horse is carried on his forward limbs. During locomotion, the forelimbs must be able to take a significant amount of pounding. The pastern functions as a shock absorber. As the weight of a horse comes down on his forehand, the pastern flexes, dropping the fetlock. The pastern slants… Read More Horse Anatomy: Pastern