Side Pull Bridle

The side-pull or “breaking hackamore” is used completely without a bit. Generally, it is used when a colt is first broke to take a rider. It offers good lateral control without confusing him with a bit or damaging his mouth if hard pulls are necessary. The pressure is on the rope nose piece that can… Read More Side Pull Bridle

Hackamore Bridle

Hackamores are a type of horse headgear that does not have a bit. Horses have very soft faces and many areas with sensitive nerve endings. The hackamore pressures the face, nose, jaw and/or chin areas to control the horse. Bosals The earliest and still popular Bosal Hackamore is comprised of a headstall and a leather… Read More Hackamore Bridle

Bitless Bridle

Bitless Bridle “Less pain means more brain” The bitless bridle is slowly becoming popular – particularly among natural horse trainers and western riders. However, it is not yet accepted by all disciplines (much like barefoot horses). The world of horse training is very slow to change, and many, many riders equate the bit with absolute… Read More Bitless Bridle

Gag Bit

Gag Bits Explained I am not an expert in Gag Bits. Most of this information was gleaned from other’s writings. If any of our Horse-Pros.com friends would like to contribute, please feel free to do so. The sliding action of a Gag Bit applies most of the pressure to the horse’s lips and corners of… Read More Gag Bit

Spade Bit

Solid High Ports such as Cathedrals and spooned ports make contact with the palate of the horse – some in more severe ways than others. The rider’s soft hands are critical here. The balance of a Spade, Spoon or Cathedral bit is critical, as they must be ridden straight-up neutral to keep the spoon off… Read More Spade Bit

Pelham Bit

Introduction to Pelham Horse Bits The pelham bit has one rein (split) or two-rein capability. It has a large D-ring directly attached to the mouthpiece for a snaffle rein and a curb loop at the bottom of the shank for a curb rein. The snaffle rein is used most often for general riding, lateral turns,… Read More Pelham Bit

Snaffle Bit Basics

Shop Snaffle Bits Introduction to Snaffle Bits The Snaffle configuration by itself is a mild bit and one of the most universally used mouthpieces. It can be thick and mild on the bars and tongue or more severe if it has a thin twisted wire mouthpiece. It can be combined with many variations such as… Read More Snaffle Bit Basics

Bit Transition

Whether bitting your horse for the first time or transitioning to a new bit, put the headstall and bit onto your horse in a comfortable, confined space such as his stall, and let him wear it daily – slowly working the time up to several hours – before you add reins or pressure. You can… Read More Bit Transition

Choosing a Bit

Simple Considerations for Choosing a Horse Bit Before you choose a bit, consider 1. Your horse’s age and dentition: Most beginning trainers think that a horse works his way from a “gentle” bit to a “severe” bit as he gets older and better trained. Actually that is the opposite of what is true. A simple… Read More Choosing a Bit

Salivation

A horse’s mouth with a foreign object in it (a bit) will likely need some saliva to lubricate the fit and comfort of the bit. However, there is a belief that salivation aids relaxation. In other words, a happy mouth is a wet mouth. And a relaxed horse, has a happy mouth. In some show… Read More Salivation